Tim Devine

Posts Tagged ‘Art’

Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park

Two computers face each other and play a game of chess together using spoken moves and speech recognition.


Our encounters with technology spark a diversity of human emotions. Continuously extending in parallel with technological development. Technology is more embedded, sensory and mobile, and as a result, so is the behavior of the objects that embrace it. What experiences do we expect from our encounters with our everyday objects? How would we like our robots to relate to us: subservient, intimate, dependent, equal? How will the behavior of objects change our relationship to them. How would you perceive two computers at leisure playing chess in a park speaking english to each other?


This project embraces several themes from AI and gaming, to a technological spectacle and autonomous verbal communication between otherwise computational devices. By staging two computers in a park playing chess we are also establishing them in a role of leisure; the computers are perceived as not performing a task for the user but more as performing a task for themselves.


This project is in collaboration with Onur Sönmez


Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park Close Up

Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park

Two computers face each other and play a game of chess together using spoken moves and speech recognition.


This project embraces several themes from AI and gaming, to a technological spectacle and autonomous verbal communication between otherwise computational devices. By staging two computers in a park playing chess we are also establishing them in a role of leisure; the computers are perceived as not performing a task for the user but more as performing a task for themselves.


This project is in collaboration with Onur Sönmez


Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park on a Bench

Money Conducts Electricity!!!

Place a coin or as many coins as you can from your pocket onto a table to create an electrical circuit; to make a connection.

The user places a coin onto the nylon plastic table, joining two of the slightly raised metal slugs thus creating an electronic circuit.  The connection is detected instantly by a computer that then flashes an image (2-3 frames) onto the underside of the table, viewable on top; at the same time generating a ‘snappy’, ‘lightening like’ sound in sync with the image.  This repeats slowly at random intervals (3-5sec) until the coin is taken off.  The more coins on the table the quicker and more frequent it flashes. Please see attached illustrations.

The aim is to create a work that emphasises interaction and encourages the user to consider and participate in a fiscal narrative with social consequences. This work is more than a live video installation, a virtual experience, a technological puzzle or illusion; it focuses instead on actual user interaction and the experience of a result; and then the taking of that experience with them into the streets.  What happens when they next meet a beggar on the street?

The work was born from the phrase ‘Money Conducts Electricity’. The images represent randomly all things that money influences – oil industries, homeless people, political figures, mass production, education, the third world, war, music, environment, consumer choices etc.

Money Conducts Electricity!!!

Place

a coin

or as many coins as you can from your pocket onto a table to create an electrical circuit; to make a connection.

The user places a coin onto the nylon plastic table, joining two of the slightly raised metal slugs thus creating an electronic circuit.  The connection is detected instantly by a computer that then flashes an image (2-3 frames) onto the underside of the table, viewable on top; at the same time generating a ‘snappy’, ‘lightening like’ sound in sync with the image.  This repeats slowly at random intervals (3-5sec) until the coin is taken off.  The more coins on the table the quicker and more frequent it flashes. Please see attached illustrations.
The aim is to create a work that emphasises interaction and encourages the user to consider and participate in a fiscal narrative with social consequences. This work is more than a live video installation, a virtual experience, a technological puzzle or illusion; it focuses instead on actual user interaction and the experience of a result; and then the taking of that experience with them into the streets.  What happens when they next meet a beggar on the street?
The work was born from the phrase ‘Money Conducts Electricity’. The images represent randomly all things that money influences – oil industries, homeless people, political figures, mass production, education, the third world, war, music, environment, consumer choices etc.