Tim Devine

Posts Tagged ‘Game’

Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park

Two computers face each other and play a game of chess together using spoken moves and speech recognition.


Our encounters with technology spark a diversity of human emotions. Continuously extending in parallel with technological development. Technology is more embedded, sensory and mobile, and as a result, so is the behavior of the objects that embrace it. What experiences do we expect from our encounters with our everyday objects? How would we like our robots to relate to us: subservient, intimate, dependent, equal? How will the behavior of objects change our relationship to them. How would you perceive two computers at leisure playing chess in a park speaking english to each other?


This project embraces several themes from AI and gaming, to a technological spectacle and autonomous verbal communication between otherwise computational devices. By staging two computers in a park playing chess we are also establishing them in a role of leisure; the computers are perceived as not performing a task for the user but more as performing a task for themselves.


This project is in collaboration with Onur Sönmez


Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park Close Up

The Mexican Standoff – Creating a Hyperreality

blood and electrode

The Mexican Standoff removes the link between the persons thoughts and actions; people are directly thinking about what they are doing – creating a hyperreality.
Two people use their minds via EEG headsets to fire their guns in a Mexican Standoff realised in an first person shooter (FPS). The characters take a long time to die so the game can last for quite some time. To trigger the EEG interface the person needs to think about pulling a trigger on their right hand.  When this is detected the avatar will begin to shoot the other. In popular culture, a Mexican Standoff is usually portrayed as two or more opponents with guns at the ready, creating a very tense situation. A Mexican standoff is a slang term defined as a stalemate or impasse, a confrontation that neither side can win.

The Mexican Standoff removes the physical link between the persons thoughts and actions; people are directly thinking about what they are doing – creating a hyperreality.

Two players stand facing each other in a long room wearing EEG headsets connected wirelessly to a computer. The first-person view of each player from Counter Strike is projected onto the opponents body; so each player is ‘clothed’ in their Counter Strike character. When the headsets detect via EEG analysis that the player is relaxed they will fire their weapon.

In popular culture, a Mexican Standoff is usually portrayed as two or more opponents with guns at the ready, creating a very tense situation. A Mexican standoff is a slang term defined as a stalemate or impasse, a confrontation that neither side can win.

This was developed with Onur Sönmez at MediaLab Prado, Madrid in January 2010

Thumb Fu!

Thumb Fu

Thumb Fu! is super enhanced thumb wrestling.
We use conductive fabric and thread to create thumb suits.  When the characters touch sound effects are triggered.  If somebody is pinned down a countdown begins and then a winning fanfare is played.

Temple Electronica

The Ars Electronica building in Linz, Austria is very different to any other building in the city. It interfaces with the city similar to the way religious buildings have throughout history. As for what the building represents as The Museum of the Future, it could also be said that technology actually makes us behave in strange disciplined ways similar to religious customs.

Temple Electronica provides all the answers to everyone’s questions. The first ever temple of its kind in the world is situated in the heart of the city of Linz. Ask your private questions and let the answer out to the whole world.

Oh people let yourself be saved, assured or discouraged… BELIEVE!

To touch the frog and ask your question please visit Ars Electronica Museum’s Main Deck – September 5 2009 after 23 o’clock.

Temple Electronica is a project in collaboration with Onur Sönmez


Temple Electronica Oracle Frog

The Oracle Frog at the Ars Electronica Centre Linz

A Game of Marbles

A Game Of Marbles A Game of Marbles

Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park

Two computers face each other and play a game of chess together using spoken moves and speech recognition.


This project embraces several themes from AI and gaming, to a technological spectacle and autonomous verbal communication between otherwise computational devices. By staging two computers in a park playing chess we are also establishing them in a role of leisure; the computers are perceived as not performing a task for the user but more as performing a task for themselves.


This project is in collaboration with Onur Sönmez


Two Computers at Leisure Playing Chess in a Park on a Bench

A Game of Marbles

A Game of Marbles uses the the Unreal Tournament 3D game engine as its foundation to explore notions of physical interactivity. Players flick marbles into a ring instead of twiddling hand controllers. The marbles are represented on a display screen by graphical characters, which battle according to the throw of the marbles.

A Game of Marbles was exhibited at the 2006 Next Wave festival.

This project is in collaboration with Gerard Mason

A Game Of Marbles was exhibited during the Next Wave FestivalA Game of Marbles was exhibited at the Next Wave Festival 2006.